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  2. 17 Carnations: The Royals, the Nazis and the Biggest Cover-up in History | Ramsey County Libraries
  3. 17 Carnations: The Royals, the Nazis, and the Biggest Cover-Up in History

And that doesn't even compare with their views of Hitler and the Nazis. The middle third of the book is about how this feckless duo ended up in the Bahamas. They wanted the prestige of being royalty without the responsibility. They wanted the wealth of royalty but they did not want to pay taxes or use any of their own money for travel.

They acted like parasites!

17 Carnations: The Royals, Windors, the Nazis and the Biggest Cover-Up in History

The last part of the book is about the actual cover-up of the pair's behavior and the struggle between historians and governments in how to deal with all the incriminating evidence against them. I found it difficult to fathom how, when confronted with actual telegrams sent before and during the war, that the Duke and the British government declared them falsifications. A point is made that the war documents were used in the Nuremburg Trials, and yet they are stated to be inaccurate when revealing unbecoming behavior of a British royal. Reading an account of something like this makes one appreciate how history is recorded and interpreted.

I now have a totally different opinion of the House of Windsor.

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Just for starters, it was never told in my earlier history classes that the Duchess of Windsor was not just a divorcee - she was twice divorced with 2 living husbands when she married the Duke. AND she had her affair with the Duke while she was still married to her second husband.

I have one beef with the book: the 17 carnations as part of the title is a bit lame since that seems to be based on unsubstantiated information. I expected more from this than what was written. Jul 12, Joy rated it really liked it. Andrew Morton is a skilled and conscientious popular historian. He follows the young prince from his days at "public" school, where upper class boys learned to be either bully or victim and Edward learned he was a victim; to his reluctant but successful tours to support the contact between British royalty and the rest of the world; to his hatred of his legacy and preference for partying and mistresses; to Wallis.

By the time Edward inherited the throne, his soul was given to a married woman who was considered by most to be a gold digger. Nazi officials were welcomed to their parties, and the government's boxes of confidential documents were left lying around openly where anyone could read them.

17 Carnations: The Royals, the Nazis, and the Biggest Cover-Up in History

Fortunately, Edward had never wanted to be king and seized the opportunity to get out of it. Even after Edward abdicated and married her, they would not meet her or even allow their subjects to do her the honors she had married into. Because Edward continued to push for Wallis's honors all his life, the family remained at odds with him.

Because Edward continued to work publically against Britain's opposition to the Nazis, he couldn't even be safely kept within England's boundaries. In effect, the family left him no one to turn to except Nazi sympathizers; and Wallis became angrily anti-British. If they could have brought themselves to treat Edward's wife with common politeness, and kept the couple under wraps in England, they would have spared themselves the loss of Allied good will caused by the British government's determination in the following decades to cover up Edward's indiscretions and protect the reputation of the royal family.

There seems to be such a fear among Royalists that Britain might tear down its figurehead monarchy, that the only possible response to misbehavior by family members is to cover it up. What extremes will they go to, to protect the family's reputation? Look at Princess Di. Oddly enough, once the Nazi file on the Windsors finally saw the light, the public wasn't particularly scandalized.

As long as the world loves glamour, the Royalist paranoia is unnecessary and self-destructive. Nov 08, Tim Stretton rated it it was ok. Most of the book devoted to the uncontroversial thesis that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor were Nazi sympathisers, with some innuendo that they were outright traitors.


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Neither was it a revelation that both were wholly self-absorbed. The "greatest cover-up in history" was that the British government attempted to suppress documents leading to the above conclusions; since they failed, this hardly constitutes a cover-up. This latter phase of the book is rendered in excruciatingly dull detail--it fe Most of the book devoted to the uncontroversial thesis that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor were Nazi sympathisers, with some innuendo that they were outright traitors.

This latter phase of the book is rendered in excruciatingly dull detail--it felt as if the reader had been button-holed by the Duke of Windsor himself bemoaning the fates which left him sitting out the war in the Bahamas while his cherished sheets were commandeered by the Nazis in Paris.

17 Carnations: The Royals, the Nazis and the Biggest Cover-up in History | Ramsey County Libraries

Ho hum. May 08, Amy rated it did not like it. It started out with such promise. I was so intrigued with the story and the details behind the royal abdication and connection with the Nazis, but less than halfway through, I just couldn't handle it anymore. The author threw out random name after random name after random name. Maybe if you are incredibly well indoctrinated into the royal history of the ss, you could easily follow along, but I'm not and I couldn't. It just got to be ridiculous because the names weren't important and weren It started out with such promise.

It just got to be ridiculous because the names weren't important and weren't moving the story along. The whole second half of the book was all about the hiding and searching for Nazi paperwork regarding the former King. I finally gave up because I have way too many other books to read, and I was completely dreading every second of this one.


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  6. Not quite as salacious as the title would make you think but then again in today's world there isn't much that would be considered salacious. It's not surprising how discreet the royal family tries to be about their lapses in judgment and that's about what this adds up to. So the Duke former king said that if he was on the throne things would have been different and he would have stopped the war.

    At the time, with appeasement talk like that I'm sure that was considered treasonous, a word Morto Not quite as salacious as the title would make you think but then again in today's world there isn't much that would be considered salacious. At the time, with appeasement talk like that I'm sure that was considered treasonous, a word Morton uses fairly often. What this book really did was make me appreciate George VI even more for all that he overcame and dislike Edward who comes off as a spoiled, self-absorbed I may include a few "salacious" quotes here later Everyone knows about it or supposed it.

    I mean, the aristocracy was pretty racist and anti-Semitic back then, just like a lot of the general population. It was really only twisted later that they were against the anti-Semitism. And that isn't just with Britain, but also with the United Stat 3. And that isn't just with Britain, but also with the United States. I've only heard some of it, and mostly biased accounts, of propaganda against Wallis. Really, she seems like a woman of her time who played the wrong cards.

    And who didn't want to be married to Edward VIII but got boxed into a hole where she couldn't do anything but that. Although I'd love to read more about it from her perspective to see if my opinion holds up.

    This is a good book. A bit sensationalist with the title, but it seems to have solid history behind it.

    17 Carnations: The Royals, the Nazis, and the Biggest Cover-Up in History

    Then again, I'm listening to it rather than reading it so I can't quite see the citations without having to get a physical copy to flip through. Also, a random tangent. I think it was one of the smarter allusions that Mofftiss made. Nov 26, Kate rated it it was ok. Oh, how could I resist? Chapter 2: "Adolph Hitler, Royal Matchmaker"-- can you honestly resist that?

    I readily admit that I am susceptible to any collection of Windsor correspondence or Windsor-related gossip, and the first part of this book gave me that. Some of it already was well known, but there were quite a few fresh factoids. Did you know that A Hitler was a big Walt Disney fan? The story of the plot to kidnap the Windsors for political purposes was weirdly fascinating. The final four chapters of the book presented a detailed explication of the whereabouts and disposition of certain German documents that would have been embarrassing to the royal family if laid open to the world at large.